The Porning of America: The Rise of Porn Culture, What it Means, and Where We Go from Here

The Porning of America: The Rise of Porn Culture, What it Means, and Where We Go from Here

From the popular Bratz dolls to the infamous photos from Abu Ghraib, The Porning of America reveals that porn has become the mainstream-and the mainstream has become porn.

Carmine Sarracino and Kevin Scott argue that porn has seeped into and been absorbed by every defining aspect of our culture: language, entertainment, fashion, advertising, sexual behavior, even politics.

Cultural absorption is so complete that we no longer have to purchase pornography to get porn because we increasingly live porn on a daily basis.In tracing porn's transformation-from the Civil War to the golden age of comic books in the 1940s and 1950s to the adult film industry's golden decade of the 1970s and up to today-the authors illustrate that what began in the dark alleys of American life has now emerged as an unapologetic multibillion-dollar industry.

In this astonishingly comprehensive book, Sarracino and Scott profile such "porn exemplars"-those who have been pivotal to the mainstreaming of porn-as Russ Meyer, Snoop Dogg, Jenna Jameson, and Paris Hilton; they document how mainstream advertising uses porn culture to sell commercial goods now to an even younger, "tween" audience; and they pose crucial questions: How has porn shaped the way we view our own and others' bodies?

Sarracino and Scott argue that the mistreatment of prisoners at Abu Ghraib exposed our porned sensibilities.Not an anti-porn diatribe, The Porning of America is resolutely pro-sex.

Reviews of the The Porning of America: The Rise of Porn Culture, What it Means, and Where We Go from Here

The authors wrote this book to sound the alarm about violently degrading porn that might well bring Nazi horrors to these shores and the generally porned atmosphere that threatens the innocence of children. The book is pretty much a plea for a Hegelian dialectic of porn, in which the end of history happens when everyone acknowledges one another as a happy and equally empowered sex worker (as long as the sex workers are of legal age, or course, and their videos are kept in places where the kids can't find them). The authors actually suggest that good sex education programs can bring this about.

Too many moments of "such and such girl said or did this, and therefore all girls of her age in America feel this way." Listen, where I come from, (and I come from Portland, Oregon, which is fairly progressive) if I walk up to a woman and call her a slut, she will NOT think I'm complimenting her, no matter what the authors believe. This gets labeled as part of the porning of America, but I beg to differ. In fact, in many ways I see such exhibitions as BREAKING DOWN the porning of America. The problem with America is that it has become so sexualized that nudity of any type is regarded as obscene. It's social taboos that make body parts obscene, and I wish that the authors could have better divided the attitude of "porning" from the simplicity of being nude.

Any time the book discusses women, they are setting white women as the default. Considering that non-white women are not discussed, it is no surprise that the authors failed to research the role that minority women play on porn. The authors here ignored the tendency of non-white women to so often be seen as hyper-sexed animals who exist solely to please white men -Slut shaming, virginity and the social stigma of sex. The authors ignore trans individuals, the role of queer performers in porn, or the use of queer sex as a way of appealing to straight male audiences. Nor did they discuss the significant age difference between Hilton and her boyfriend, how the power dynamic of pornography and sex may have influenced her decision to approve a video, or how her later publicly actions may have been influenced by having this slut label forced upon her. This book outright says that Paris Hilton did porn for the attention. This book desperately needed the input of a strong female editor or contributor - How could they have thought is was a good idea to name a chapter Women and Porn and then spend the majority of the time discussing feminist anti-pornography leagues? If anything, this book serves as proof that porn represents a culture that values women and POC far below white men on the social ladder.

Here's the book in a nutshell: As porn becomes more mainstream, we become more porned. The most informative part of the book was the discussion of how violence and porn are increasingly connected, and how that is the next step in our collective "porning." They make a good case for the fact that the infamous pictures of Abu Gharib are partially a product of this trend, and that similar scenes must be expected in the future.

But these chapters read like a handful of separate essays rather than a unified book.

There are majorly false extrapolations on the perceived effects of porn, its effects on society, etc.

The authors present a convincing case that much of modern advertising and culture has been deeply influenced by porn, in terms of the image and text selection, and in terms of the steady downward definition of deviancy. That's definitely guffaw-inspiring, because Marston was a bit of a kink, and Wonder Woman was explicitly created as a vehicle for him to portray bondage fantasies - in service to his notions of appropriate sexual outlets for men being related to the submission of strong women.

Porn usage/creation can be an antecedent or a symptom of sexual objectification. Regardless of whether porn is an antecedent or cause of dehumanisation we should be concerned and watchful of its increase use and integration into America's societal norms. * I think the book relied too much on its sensationalist topic (porn) to the detriment of what I found its more interesting topic ('othering' and 'dehumanisation').

The APA case studies are constantly used and when it comes to sexuality and if you have read other texts you would know that Psychology is sometimes behind on the times, still listing transgendered as a disorder and only recently removing homosexuality. This book reads as two men trying to protect their children (primarily their girls) from what the world really is. If they actually opened some good psychology texts they would know that bondage play is healthy for some people and that fantasy including rape fantasy is a normal function and these pornographic images help in these processes.

  • English

  • Nonfiction

  • Rating: 3.44
  • Pages: 272
  • Publish Date: September 1st 2008 by Beacon Press
  • Isbn10: 0807061530
  • Isbn13: 9780807061534